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The Promoters: Doug Verb

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Doug Verb HeadshotRecently, Fun While It Lasted had the pleasure of speaking to long-time sports executive Doug Verb for the latest entry in our Promoters Series.

Doug was one of the founding executives behind the Major Indoor Soccer League and the Arena Football League and served as President of the Chicago Sting soccer club from 1982 to 1986.

The Temple University grad has developed and consulted on sales promotions, event management and television deals for major sports and entertainment properties including the NBA, the Miss America Organization and numerous promotions in his home base of Las Vegas, Nevada. Doug’s company Action Sports America (www.giantjersey.com) is a promotional consultant and supplier to major and minor professional sports teams.

I asked Doug for 20 minutes of his time and came away with nearly two hours of great stories about the boom & bust years of American pro soccer in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s.

I hope you enjoy the highlights of our conversations below.  You can download the entire interview here.

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FWiL:

How did you break into pro sports, Doug?

Philadelphia AtomsDoug Verb:

With the 1976 Philadelphia Atoms of the North American Soccer League. We were the worst professional franchise in America, and I think we may still hold the title to this day.

We had a lot of the same problems that other teams had. We were terrible on the field. There was no money for marketing. We had a terrible schedule – if it was Easter Sunday or Mother’s Day or the 4th of July, that meant the Atoms had a home game. And we had absentee owners. The Atoms were owned by the four 1st Division teams in Guadalajara, Mexico.

Like I said, lots of soccer teams had those problems back then. But we also had a problem that nobody else had: no one on the Atoms spoke English and we played in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

FWIL:

You were the Chivas USA of your day!

Doug Verb:

Well, yeah, but it wasn’t set up that way! We didn’t quite have a Hispanic market in Philadelphia. We couldn’t even find a place for the guys to eat.

The local President of the Atoms was an American named Ed Tepper. Ed previously owned the Philadelphia Wings indoor lacrosse team that played at the Spectrum. Somebody recommended me to Ed to be the Atoms’ PR Director. After two or three days on the job, I went to see Ed Tepper and said ‘Ed, why are we doing this?’

Ed says ‘We’re doing this to learn about soccer. We’re gonna do indoor soccer.’

Philadelphia Atoms Indoor SoccerThe day the Mexicans got off the plane in Philadelphia, I took them right to the Spectrum. There’s no translator. I brought them out onto an Astroturf carpet that didn’t quite fit over the hockey rink. These guys clearly think that they’re just in this building to loosen up and see the locker rooms – Veterans Stadium was right next door.

I tell them “No, we’re playing a game here a las siete, at seven o’clock.”

They went back to the locker room and said no, no, no, they’re going home. So I took what they thought were their plane tickets home and I just stood in the middle of the locker room and ripped them up. Of course, it was just their receipts. I kept hearing them call me ‘Loco! Loco Verb-o!’ while I’m trying to explain indoor soccer – that it’s only five players on the field and just try it, it’s going to be fun.

And so they played an indoor exhibition that night against some local semi-pros and they did have fun. I think we had five or six thousand people in the Spectrum and afterwards I told Ed Tepper ‘There is something to this’. Indoor was fast and fun and exciting.

Anyway, then we moved outdoors and had a horrible year. The Mexicans had never seen Astroturf before. The NASL was mostly a league of English guys and our undersized players just got pounded into the turf week after week by the English players. We played on Bicentennial weekend and nobody came. I announced the attendance as 1,776. And the worst part of it all was that only one of these players ever went back and played professionally in Mexico.

So the Atoms went away. I went back to sports writing. And then two years later I got a call from Ed and another guy named Earl Foreman.

FWiL:

The founders of the Major Indoor Soccer League (MISL).

Doug Verb:

Yes. I was one of the four guys that started the MISL, along with Ed, Earl and a Ph.D from the University of New Haven named Joe Machnik, who was the soccer guy.

After the Atoms folded, I worked for The Trenton Times.  I covered soccer in Philly and New York including the New York CosmosThe Times was owned by The Washington Post so occasionally my Cosmos stories got picked up by the national Post news service.

Earl Foreman MISLEd called on my birthday. Friday the 13th of October 1978. The other guy on the phone was Earl Foreman. Earl was the closest guy that I ever met to a genius. But also on that fine line of being maniacal. Earl was a big-time lawyer. He had a lot of sports experience as an owner in the American Basketball Association, where he’d signed Julius Erving out of college, as a part owner of the Eagles, and with the old Washington Whips soccer team. His brother-in-law was Ed Snider who owned the Flyers and Earl restructured the lease for the Flyers and made the Spectrum into the country’s #1 arena. Ed Tepper convinced Earl that indoor soccer was the way to go.

They said we have this idea of Americanizing soccer. Why don’t you come over and we’d like to talk to you about how the media will look at it?

“I don’t need to come by. I’ll tell you right now. They’ll ignore you. They’ll hate you. Sports editors hate it. They don’t like soccer. The only reason I get to write a little here is because it’s the Cosmos.”

I had to cover a New Jersey Nets game that night, so I told them I had to go and I went to take a nap. The phone rang a few hours later and it was Ed and Earl again.

“We got our sixth team and we’re ready to start.”

I said “Start what?”

I started working for the MISL two days later on October 15, 1978. The only known piece we had going for us was Pete Rose, who was a part-owner of our Cincinnati Kids franchise. Pete was great. He was on his free agency trail, which was relatively new back then. I went on the road with Pete as he met with Major League teams in all of the six cities we had for the league. Pete drew throngs of reporters and he always made it a point to talk to the press about indoor soccer.

We launched the league in 69 days. We played our first game on December 22nd, 1978 with Pete Rose kicking out the first ball at the Nassau Coliseum.

Putting together the league in the fall of ’78 was like getting my Master’s degree in the sports business. The Ph.D. came when Earl Foreman said ‘Look. When we get a new franchise, you need to go there, whether it’s for the first two weeks or two months and make sure we stay away from the ‘Brother-in-Law effect’”.

Sure enough, we go into Wichita, Kansas for the first round of expansion in 1979. So Joe Machnik and I went to Wichita to meet with the <new owner>. And Joe asks ‘What about the soccer operations side?’

And of course this guy says ‘Oh, I’ve got that covered. My brother-in-law has been involved in youth soccer here in Wichita for seven years.’

I started laughing and Joe kicked me under the table. Joe told him ‘Look, this is a professional organization. I have list for you of coaches and general managers with experience in pro soccer.’

And the guy is heartbroken. He’s thinking what am I going to tell my wife?

 

FWiL:

Let’s talk about the Chicago Sting.

Doug Verb:

After five years in the MISL league office I wanted to go run a franchise. I was hired to be the President of the Chicago Sting. This was 1982. The Sting were playing soccer year-round – outdoors and indoors – in the North American Soccer League.

Chicago Sting YearbookMy guy in Chicago was Lee Stern. He was everything that was great about soccer in Chicago. He built the foundation of soccer in that town. Because of his stick-to-itiveness and his willingness to absorb what I’d estimate to be $20 million in losses over about 15 years of owning the Sting. The Sting won a couple of titles and had a big championship parade down LaSalle Street when they won the Soccer Bowl in 1981, just like the big boys did.

And yet, Lee was everything that was wrong with owners as well.

Lee would call sports editors at 2:30 in the morning and want to know why the Sting were on the second page when we’d just won a playoff game. When I got there I said to Lee ‘<The editors> all think you’re an asshole.’

And he looked at me like ‘What do you mean?’

‘No one’s ever told you this?!’

‘No!’

Once I’d been there for a little while, I realized why people weren’t being straight with him. In the early years, it was all soccer guys running the Sting. And they were all stealing from Lee. Coaches would do player deals and they’d get a piece of it on the back end. That was the way in soccer back then. The soccer guys did the equipment deals too and they were a joke. We got hardly any money from Adidas. Well, the coach was selling the equipment! Not out of the back of his car, but out of a friend’s car.

FWiL:

Who were some of the most memorable characters on those Sting teams?

Doug Verb:

Karl-Heinz Granitza was the man. He was suave and European. He was a man about town. He had limitations in his game. He wasn’t fast, he wasn’t quick. He kind of played a post-up game and he scored a lot of goals that way. He also had a trendy restaurant and some other business ventures, but he ended up leaving a lot of paper around town and he had to eventually just leave Chicago a few years after the Sting ended. It was a lot of money.

Pato Margetic was a scrawny half-German half-Argentine guy with wild blond hair. He reminded me of an indoor soccer version of Pete Maravich. He was a guy who got the ball on his foot and the crowd just stood up. I never had anything to do with player contracts, except for Pato’s. Pato wanted more money and wanted to stay in Chicago, so I got involved with his contract. We made him a model for one of our sponsors who made blue jeans to get him the extra money.

And then there were the Americans. The leader was Rudy Glenn who was from one of the Chicago suburbs and played at the University of Indiana. He was a big strong defender and he did more camps and clinics than anyone else.

In 1984 we signed a kid named Frankie Klopas who was 16 or 17 years old and underage. He went to Mather High School in Chicago, but he was born in Greece. There’s a big Greek community in Chicago. After we signed Frankie, I couldn’t walk into a Greek restaurant in Chicago – from Greektown to all the little hamburger joints – without them clearing a table for me and never letting me pay. And, of course, I didn’t have anything to do with signing him. Frankie went on to become a national team player for the U.S.

 

FWiL:

What was the impact on the Sting on bouncing around between Wrigley, Comiskey and Soldier Field every year? Why couldn’t the team settle in one place?

Doug Verb:

The impact was that even the players got confused and would go to the wrong stadium on the wrong day. So how could the fans possibly know where we were playing?

The two baseball teams didn’t want us at all. Lee Stern was a part-owner of the White Sox and he just kind of imposed his will to play at Comiskey. The White Sox were at least very cordial to us. But when I walked into Wrigley for the first time, the Cubs made it very obvious that we weren’t wanted there. Mainly for the reason of ‘you’re going to chew up the field’, which never happened.

And Soldier Field was just too big. They were all too big. We put all the fans on the TV side, so one time (coach) Willy Roy’s sons sat all alone in a huge section of empty seats. We had them hold a sign saying “Willy Roy’s Fan Club”

That was the pre-soccer specific stadium era, so everyone faced the same problem. Now my belief is that is not what kept the crowds down for the Sting outdoors. It was just the game of outdoor soccer. It just wasn’t in the blood here. Lots of kids were starting to play soccer but here’s the analogy I’ll make: Everybody bowls. But how many go to see a PBA bowling event?

And again, the Sting were exciting and high-scoring and the players were known and did all sorts of camps and clinics. I used to say to Lee Stern ‘Let’s do All-Star Games, international matches, camps and clinics and merchandise’. But forget all these year-round league games.Those we lose money on.

Lee’s response was “What am I going to do? Buy a bigger boat to take down to Florida?”

FWiL:

What did the economics of the Sting look like?

Chicago Sting ProgramDoug Verb:

The second year I was there, Lee called me and said ‘Kid, you did great. The numbers came in. You lowered the loss to a million dollars.’

The loss had been $1.7 million a year when I got there. I said ‘Oh. OK. If you’re happy that’s great. I’m not happy. I want us to make money.’

Lee says ‘I want to bonus you. I just bought you a unit of soybeans.’

Lee was a commodities broker. That’s how he made his money.

‘What does that mean?’ I asked.

‘Don’t worry, they’re not going to back a truck of beans up to your house. I’ll take care of you.’

The next day Lee calls and says ‘Kid, you’re out of the soybeans. I sold your unit.’

‘You did? Why?’

‘I put the $5,000 in your account.’

‘What do you mean?’

‘I bought them at one price, I sold them at another. You made 5 Gs.’

So, of course I said ‘Thanks! Can we do it again tomorrow?’

‘No, kid. It’s not that easy.’

FWiL:

In 1984, the North American Soccer League folded the day after the Sting won the league’s final Soccer Bowl championship. The Sting moved indoors permanently after that. What are your memories of that time?

Doug Verb:

Three weeks after we won the last Soccer Bowl, we were back playing indoor soccer at Chicago Stadium. We had joined the MISL when the NASL folded.

Indoor soccer was a show. We’d turn out the lights and introduce the team to Aaron Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man. Everybody would go crazy. That fan experience was new at the time. Something we started at the MISL.

40% of our indoor fans were women, which was very unusual at the time. They loved the players – these were average-sized guys running around in their underwear. Once the players figured that out, they’d start greasing up their legs. I’ll never forget – I had a woman come up to me who said ‘give me those two seats right there next to the bench and I’ll give you a hundred dollars a ticket.’ I think those tickets were $25 at the time.

FWiL:

What led to the end of the Sting? Was it the move to the Rosemont Horizon in 1986?

Doug Verb:

Well, I initiated the talks with the Horizon. Because it was the suburbs.

But I loved the old Chicago Stadium. How could you not? It was an incredible building. I never heard from anybody who said ‘oh no, I won’t go down there’. But I did start looking at it because we had so many fans out in the suburbs. My plan was to play maybe four or five games a year at the Horizon and continue to play the rest of the schedule at Chicago Stadium. I knew there could be some issues for indoor soccer at the Horizon.

1986 MISL All-Star Game @ Chicago. February 18, 1986We hosted the MISL All-Star Game at Chicago Stadium in February 1986. The day after that game I quit/was fired. Lee and I had just had enough of each other. My replacement committed to play the entire 1986-87 season at the Horizon, which I never would have done.

The biggest issue we, the front office, encountered was our coach Willy Roy. And I never tried to get rid of him. Willy had won Lee two Soccer Bowl titles in the NASL. But Willy would not learn indoor soccer. Remember, an outdoor coach does nothing during a game. Limited number of substitutions, can’t really call plays. Just sits there – maybe yells at a referee once in a while. Willy was great at finding talent and he trained the players hard. But for whatever reason, he would never learn the nuances of the indoor game

In contrast to a guy like Kenny Cooper, the coach of the Baltimore Blast. Kenny was English and he went to ice hockey coaches to learn about shift changes and power plays. He said ‘what’s this about going in one door and out the other’? Willy couldn’t get his players to come off the field for shift changes. Time after time we’d get beat because other teams would go on fast breaks and Willy couldn’t get his players in and out of the door!

We had the best talent, at least as good as anyone in league, with great crowds behind us. But we couldn’t get out of the first round of the playoffs. And in the MISL, that’s where you made your gravy. Playoff revenue was all yours to keep. If we would have had 5 or 6 playoff games instead of 1-2, we would have come pretty damn close to breaking even.

Who knows what might have happened if I had gotten rid of Willy and hired someone who was an indoor coach? Camps were great, we finally had sponsors paying the right amount for sponsorships and we’d put together a small TV network throughout the Midwest of Sting games that was getting decent ratings. We might not still be alive — because there’s not major market indoor soccer anymore — but we had things cooking.

And I had the time of my life. It sure was fun while it lasted.

 

==Links==

Doug Verb Full Interview Transcript

Doug’s Website – Action Sports America

Chicago Sting Home Page

More Interviews from the Promoters Series

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Written by andycrossley

April 22nd, 2015 at 12:40 pm

1980-1992 Baltimore Blast

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Baltimore Blast Yearbook

Major Indoor Soccer League (1980-1992)

Born: May 1980 – The Houston Summit relocates to Baltimore, MD.
Died: July 1992 – The Blast cease operations.

Arena: Baltimore Arena (12,506)

Team Colors: Flaming Red-Orange, Fiery Yellow & White

Owners:

 

The original Baltimore Blast were a popular, immensely entertaining entry on the Baltimore sports scene throughout the 1980’s.  The team arrived in Charm City in the spring of 1980 by way of Houston, Texas, where the franchise had failed to develop a following during the first two seasons of the Major Indoor Soccer League.  But in Baltimore, the Blast would find a rare and enviable situation – a “Major League” sports market with a distinct shortage of Major League teams.  Once the NFL’s Baltimore Colts snuck out of town on March 28th, 1984, the Blast had Baltimore’s winter sports scene all to themselves.

Sepp Gantenhammer Baltimore BlastBlast games at the Baltimore Civic Center were a spectacle, starting with the team’s elaborate pre-game introductions. The lights dimmed, Christopher Cross’ “Ride Like The Wind” boomed over the sound system, fog swirled, and the Blast cheerleaders and players charged onto the arena floor from an exploding soccer ball-shaped spaceship that descended from the ceiling.  Kool & The Gang’s “Celebration” was the Blast’s goal song and would be heard over and over again, as the high-scoring MISL averaged nearly 11 goals per match.

Beyond the marketing glitz, the Blast were a consistently terrific team under Head Coach Kenny Cooper, who moved with the team from Houston and would guide the club for all 12 seasons in Baltimore.  The Blast had fierce divisional rivalries with the New York Arrows in the early part of the 1980’s and then with the Cleveland Force in the middle of the decade.

But the team’s toughest opponent was Ron Newman’s San Diego Sockers, the great indoor dynasty of the 80’s.  The Blast made the MISL playoffs eleven times in twelve seasons.  On five occasions (’83, ’84, ’85, ’89 and ’90) the Blast advanced to the Championship Series, losing the Newman’s club four times.  Baltimore’s only MISL title came in 1984, a season when the Sockers competed in the rival North American Soccer League.

On June 8th, 1984, the Blast defeated the St. Louis Steamers in Game 5 of the MISL finals to win the league championship.  This win would mark the peak of the team’s popularity and influence in Baltimore.  The Colts had just left town.  The Blast averaged a franchise record 11,189 fans per game at the Civic Center in 1983-84.  The victory was also a vindication of one of Kenny Cooper’s boldest moves.  Eleven months earlier, Cooper paid a league record $150,000 transfer fee to purchase an overweight Yugoslav striker named Stan Stamenkovic from the Memphis Americans.  Stamenkovic, known as “The Pizza Man” for his abominable dietary and conditioning habits, led the MISL in scoring in both the regular season and playoffs and was the named the league’s Most Valuable Player for 1984.

Baltimore Blast YearbookThe Blast’s 1984 championship was sweet for original owner Bernie Rodin, as he was last man standing of the MISL’s original owners from 1978 and it was his final game in the league.  Rodin had sold the Blast for a league record $2.9 million to Nathan Scherr three months earlier and the ownership transfer would take formal effect one week after the Finals victory.

The Blast continued to be a fixture in Baltimore for the rest of the decade, averaging over 10,000 fans per game through 1986.  The fortunes of both the MISL and the Blast began to flag as the decade drew to an end.  The league nearly folded in the summer of 1988.  Budget cuts saw the Blast’s vaunted pre-game pyrotechnics scaled back in the late 1980’s, even as previously conservative NBA and NHL teams began to co-opt the MISL’s flashy game presentation tactics.  Nathan Scherr’s early 1989 sale of the Blast to Ed Hale brought just $700,000, or less than 25% of what the team commanded five years earlier.

The Blast played their final matches in April 1992.  Appropriately, the team lost their last contests to Ron Newman and the San Diego Sockers in the 1992 playoff semi-finals.  Fewer than 5,000 fans turned out for each of the semi-final games at Baltimore Arena.

The MISL went out of business  in July 1992 and the Blast closed up shop along with the league.  Within a matter of days, a new indoor club called the Baltimore Spirit was organized with Kenny Cooper returning as Head Coach and Bill Stealey as the new owner.  The Spirit entered the lower-budget National Professional Soccer League, where they would compete for six seasons.  In 1998, former Blast owner Ed Hale purchased the Spirit from Bill Stealey and changed the name back to the Baltimore Blast.  This second version of the Blast continues to play today under Ed Hale’s ownership.

 

==Slideshow==

 

==Baltimore Blast Programs on Fun While It Lasted==

Season Date Opponent Score Program Other

1980-81

1980-81 11/29/1980 vs. Philadelphia Fever W 10-7 Program
1980-81 2/19/1981 @ Hartford Hellions W 4-3 Program
1980-81 2/22/1981 @ Buffalo Stallions L 5-3 Program

1981-82

1981-82 12/22/1981 @ Cleveland Force W 6-4 Program
1981-82 12/27/1981 vs. Buffalo Stallions L 13-2 Program

1982-83

1982-83 11/5/1982 @ Chicago Sting W 6-5 (OT) Program
1982-83 3/23/1983 @ Los Angeles Lazers W 4-3 (OT) Program

1983-84

1983-84 11/26/1983 vs. Los Angeles Lazers W 7-3 Program
1983-84 11/29/1983 vs. Kansas City Comets W 7-1 Program
1983-84 12/4/1983 vs. Buffalo Stallions W 7-4 Program
1983-84 1/19/1984 @ Los Angeles Lazers L 4-3 Program
1983-84 2/5/1984 @ Cleveland Force W 6-5 Program
1983-84 4/15/1984 @ Cleveland Force W 3-2 Program

1984-85

1984-85 3/26/1985 @ Los Angeles Lazers L 4-3 Program
1984-85 4/28/1985 @ Los Angeles Lazers W 5-4 Program
1984-85 5/10/1985 @ Cleveland Force W 4-3 Program

1985-86

1985-86 1/4/1986 vs. Dallas Sidekicks W 8-4 Program
1985-86 1/17/1986 @ Los Angeles Lazers W 4-3 Program
1985-86 3/6/1986 @ Chicago Sting L 5-2 Program

1986-87

1986-87 1/9/1987 @ Los Angeles Lazers L 5-2 Program
1986-87 2/1/1987 vs. San Diego Sockers  W 7-3 Program
1986-87 2/3/1987 vs. Dynamo Moscow W 8-7 Program Game Notes
1986-87 3/27/1987 @ Los Angeles Lazers L 4-3 Program

1987-88

1987-88 12/26/1987 @ Wichita Wings L 5-4 Program
1987-88 1/15/1988 @ Los Angeles Lazers W 10-4 Program
1987-88 3/18/1988 @ Los Angeles Lazers L 12-6 Program

1988-89

1988-89 12/3/1988 @ Los Angeles Lazers W 6-2 Program
1988-89 1/7/1989 @ Los Angeles Lazers L 6-1 Program
1988-89 2/7/1989 @ Los Angeles Lazers L 10-7 Program
1988-89 3/16/1989 @ Los Angeles Lazers L 3-2 Program
1988-89 6/2/1989 @ San Diego Sockers  L 5-2 Program
1988-89 6/4/1989 @ San Diego Sockers  L 4-3 Program
1988-89 6/6/1989 @ San Diego Sockers  w 6-3 Program
1988-89 6/10/1989 vs. San Diego Sockers  L 6-5 Video

1989-90

1989-90 4/20/1990 @ Cleveland Crunch  W 7-6 (OT) Program

 

 

==Key Players==

 

==In Memoriam==

Blast defender Mike Reynolds passed away at age 27 on July 1, 1991, two days after suffering a stroke at a Blast promotional event.

Former MISL MVP Stan Stamenkovic (Blast ’83-’88) died from a slip-and-fall in Serbia on January 28, 1996.  He was 39.

English forward Paul Crossley (Blast ’80-’83) died from a heart attack at the age of 47 on March 11, 1996.

Former Blast owner Nathan Scherr (’84-’88) died of Parkinson’s disease on November 21, 2003 at age 80. Baltimore Sun obit.

Canadian striker Domenic Mobilio (’89-’92) died of a heart attack on November 13, 2004 at the age of 35.

Paul Kitson (’83-’86) died of a heart attack while conducting a soccer clinic on August 25, 2005.  Kitson was 49.

Goalkeeper Slobo Ilijevski (Blast ’88-’89) passed away July 14, 2008 at age 58 after suffering a ruptured aorta during a soccer game.

Billy Ronson (’86-’92) passed away of undisclosed causes on April 8, 2015. Ronson was 58.

 

==YouTube==

Blast vs. San Diego Sockers. 1983 MISL Championship Series Game 4 at Baltimore Arena. May 19, 1983.

==Downloads==

2-3-1987 Baltimore Blast vs. Dynamo Moscow Game Program

 

==Links==

The Blast had one at last“, E.M. Swift, Sports Illustrated, June 18, 1984

Major It Never Was, but Covering Soccer Was a Blast“, Melody Simmons, The Baltimore Sun, July 19, 1992

Major Indoor Soccer League Media Guides

Major Indoor Soccer League Programs

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Chicago Sting vs. St. Louis Steamers. April 16, 1988

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Ernie Buriano Chicago StingChicago Sting vs. St. Louis Steamers
April 16, 1988
Rosemont Horizon
Attendance: 4,604

Major Indoor Soccer League Programs
52 Pages

 

A quiet, downbeat ending to two proud American soccer franchises on a spring Saturday night in suburban Chicago.  The St. Louis Steamers hung a 4-3 overtime defeat on the host Chicago Sting in what would prove to be the final game for both franchises.  As the Sting’s Chicago Tribune beat writer, the late John Leptich, put it the next morning: “The term sudden death never had more applications.”

The Sting, at the time, were the longest continuously operating pro soccer club in the United States.  Founded on Halloween 1974 by commodities Lee Stern, the Sting won two outdoor soccer championships in the North American Soccer League in the early 1980’s before moving permanently indoors in 1984.  The team drew huge crowds at Chicago Stadium for indoor soccer early in the decade.  But a 1986 move to the suburban Rosemont Horizon coincided with a loss of form on the field.  Attendance cratered from over 10,000 per match during the 1984-85 campaign to fewer than 6,000 two years later.  By the spring of 1988, ever a stalwart backer like Stern was exhausted and a possible sale and relocated to Denver or Milwaukee was rumored.

If the Major Indoor Soccer League itself survived, that is.  As this final weekend of the 1987-88 regular season calendar approached, the MISL was at loggerheads with its Players’ Association over a new collective bargaining agreement.  League owners wanted to slash the salary cap from the existing $1.25M to $898,000 per season.  The owners held all the leverage.  On April 5th, 1988, league officials threatened to cancel the 1988 MISL playoffs and fold the league if the players didn’t capitulate.  The union signed off on the new deal just before midnight on April 14th, 1988.  The playoffs would happen after all, but that mattered little to Chicago or St. Louis, who had each clinched last place in their respective divisions.

The St. Louis Steamers, founded in 1979, were in worse shape than the Sting in April 1988.  Once the MISL’s model franchise, the Steamers outdrew the NHL’s St. Louis Blues every winter from 1980 through 1984.  Their 1981-82 season average of 17,107 fans per game remains the highest in the history of indoor soccer.  But ownership turnover and questionable trades eroded the club competitively and at the box office in the mid-1980’s.  The day before this match, the Steamers failed to make payroll and the team arrived in Chicago clutching IOUs.

Poli Garcia St. Louis SteamersOn “Fan Appreciation Night” at the Horizon, many of the Sting’s fan favorites were in street clothes.  Pato Margetic, Frank Klopas, Frantz Mathieu, Heinz Wirtz and Chris Vaccaro watched from the Chicago bench.  Nevertheless, the hosts carried a 3-2 lead into the final quarter.  With eight minutes to go, St Louis’ Boki Bandovic beat Chicago’s reserve goalkeeper Jay McCutcheon to know the match at 3-3 and send it to overtime.

Four minutes in, Poli Garcia of the Steamers struck for his 50th goal of the season to give St. Louis a 4-3 sudden death victory.

“I guess the way to win games is not to pay the players,” Lee Stern remarked to The Tribune afterwards, noting the Steamers’ two-game winning streak after their final paychecks bounced.

Poli Garcia’s golden goal ended not just the game, but the season and the existence of both clubs.  The Steamers were booted from the MISL two months later and the Chicago Sting closed up shop in early July 1988.  Indoor soccer would soon return to both cities.  The Chicago Power (1988-1996) of the lower-budget AISA started up in the fall of 1988 with a collection of ex-Sting players.  The MISL expanded back into St. Louis with the St. Louis Storm (1989-1992) a year later.  But neither club would recapture the following of the Sting or the Steamers in their early 80’s prime.

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Chicago soccer trivia from the Sting’s final match that only Peter Wilt may care about:

  • Match referee Bill Maxwell also called the Sting’s final outdoor match, the club’s NASL Soccer Bowl victory on October 4, 1984
  • Pato Margetic was the only player on both the Sting’s final outdoor roster in 1984 and final indoor roster in 1988.
  • Brazilian forward Batata, a four-time MISL All-Star, scored the final goal in Sting history.
  • Ernie Buriano (Sting ’86-’88) appeared on the cover of the final Sting game program (top right).

 

==Links==

Chicago Sting Home Page

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Written by andycrossley

March 4th, 2015 at 12:35 pm

1974-1984 Vancouver Whitecaps

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Vancouver Whitecaps Media GuideNorth American Soccer League (1974-1984)

Born: December 11, 1973 – NASL expansion franchise.
Died: January 1985 – The Whitecaps cease operations.

Stadiums:

Arenas:

  • 1980-1981: Pacific Coliseum
  • 1981-1982: PNE Agrodome
  • 1983-1984: Pacific Coliseum

Team Colors:

Owners:

 

The original Vancouver Whitecaps were British Columbia’s beloved pro soccer club of the 1970’s and early 1980’s.  The club competed in the North American Soccer League from 1974 until 1984.  The ‘Caps also brought an attractive slate of international exhibitions to Vancouver, importing top foreign clubs such as Fluminense, Manchester City, Manchester United, Rangers and Roma for friendly matches and tournaments.  From 1980 to 1984, the Whitecaps played indoor soccer during the winter months.

Vancouver Whitecaps Media GuideOne of the NASL’s top clubs during the late 1970’s, the Whitecaps finest hour came at the conclusion of the 1979 season.  The Whitecaps dispatched the two-time defending champion New York Cosmos in the playoff semi-finals.  Then, on the Cosmos’ home ground at Giants Stadium in New Jersey, the Whitecaps beat the Tampa Bay Rowdies 2-1 in Soccer Bowl ’79 to capture their first and only title.  An estimated 100,000 fans gathered in downtown Vancouver for a parade to honor the team.

Midway through the 1983 season, the Whitecaps left their long-time home at Empire Stadium to move into the 60,000-seat B.C. Place stadium.  The team’s first game at B.C. Place on June 20, 1983 drew 60,342 fans, which set a Canadian pro soccer attendance record which would stand for three decades.

But attendance in the new dome dipped quickly and by the start of the 1984 season, original founder Herb Capozzi had turned over controlling interest in the team to oil millionaire Bob Carter.  Carter’s reign was an embarrassment.  With the club bleeding millions of dollars, Carter made noises about folding the club in the middle of the 1984 NASL season.  The ‘Caps would end up finishing out the year, knocked out in the playoff semi-finals by the Chicago Sting.  While the ‘Caps were playing out what would be their final games in late 1984, Carter was busy getting himself into hot water for lurid S&M hijinks with a pair of underage prostitutes.

Deep in debt, and with the rest of the NASL collapsing around it, the Whitecaps declared bankruptcy in January 1985 and went out of business.  The Whitecaps name was revived in 2001 and the “new” Whitecaps now compete in Major League Soccer.

 

==Slideshow==

 

 

 

==Vancouver Whitecaps Programs on Fun While It Lasted==

Season Date Opponent Score Program Other

1974

1974 7/7/1974 vs. St. Louis Stars W 2-1 (SO) Program

1975

1975 5/28/1975 @ New York Cosmos W 1-0 Program
1975 7/3/1975 @ Portland Timbers  L 2-1 Program

1976

1976 5/16/1976 @ San Jose Earthquakes L 2-0 Program
1976 5/19/1976 vs. Rangers T 2-2 Program
1976 7/7/1976 vs. San Jose Earthquakes L 1-0 Program
1976 7/27/1976 vs. Borussia Moenchengladbach W 4-3 Program

1977

1977 4/8/1977 vs. Portland Timbers  L 1-0 Program
1977 6/30/1977 vs. New York Cosmos W 5-3 Program Game Notes
1977 7/5/1977 vs. Seattle Sounders W 1-0 Program

1978

1978 6/22/1978 vs. Tulsa Roughnecks W 5-1 Program
1978 8/12/1978 @ Portland Timbers  L 1-0 Program

1979

1979 3/30/1979 vs. Dallas Tornado L 2-0 (SO) Program
1979 6/10/1979 @ Minnesota Kicks L 1-0 Program
1979 7/15/1979 @ New York Cosmos W 4-2 Program Game Notes
1979 8/18/1979 vs. Dallas Tornado W 2-1 Program
1979 9/8/1979 Tampa Bay Rowdies W 2-1 Program

1980

1980 5/21/1980 vs. A.S. Roma T 1-1 Program
1980 5/24/1980 vs. Manchester City W 5-0 Program Video
1980 6/29/1980 vs. New York Cosmos L 3-0 Program
1980 7/6/1980 vs. Rochester Lancers L 3-1 Program

1981

1981 4/18/1981 @ Portland Timbers  W 2-1 (OT) Program
1981 5/11/1981 vs. West Bromwich Albion W 2-1 Program
1981 6/3/1981 vs. Manchester City W 2-0 Program
1981 6/6/1981 vs. Calgary Boomers L 3-2 (SO) Program
1981 6/29/1981 vs. Napoli T 1-1 Program
1981 7/12/1981 @ Chicago Sting L 2-1 (OT) Program
1981 7/15/1981 vs. Sparta Rotterdam W 4-0 Program
1981 8/12/1981 vs. Seattle Sounders W 5-0 Program
1981 8/19/1981 vs. San Jose Earthquakes W 3-1 Program
1981 8/26/1981 vs. Tampa Bay Rowdies L 1-0 Program
1981 10/11/1981 @ Nottingham Forest T 2-2 Program 1 Team Sheet
1981 10/11/1981  @ Nottingham Forest T 2-2 Program 2

1982

1982 3/23/1982 vs. Borussia Moenchengladbach ?? Program
1982 6/19/1982 @ Chicago Sting W 3-2 (Shootout) Program
1982 6/23/1982 @ New York Cosmos L 3-2 Program

1983

1983 6/20/1983 vs. Seattle Sounders W 2-1 Program
1983 8/6/1983 vs. Seattle Sounders L 2-1 Program
1983 9/8/1983 vs. Toronto Blizzard W 1-0 Program

1983-84 (Indoor)

1983-84 12/30/1983 @ Chicago Sting L 7-3 Program
1983-84 1/13/1984 @ Chicago Sting L 4-3 (OT) Program

1984

1984 5/20/1984 @ New York Cosmos L 2-1 Program
1984 5/23/1984 vs. Golden Bay Earthquakes W 5-3 Program
1984 5/27/1984 vs. Ajax L 2-1 Program
1984 6/6/1984 vs. Fluminense W 3-1 Program
1984 6/27/1984 vs. Chicago Sting W 1-0 Program
1984 8/29/1984 @ New York Cosmos L 2-1 Program
1984 9/18/1984 @ Chicago Sting W 1-0 (OT) Program
1984 9/23/1984 vs. Chicago Sting L 3-1 Program

 

==Key Players==

 

==In Memoriam==

Alan Ball (Whitecaps ’79-’80) died April 25, 2007 of a heart attack while fighting a fire in his home. Daily Telegraph obituary.

Former Whitecaps GM Peter Bridgwater (’79-’83) passed away from cancer on June 21, 2005.  Soccer America obituary.

Whitecaps founder and long-time owner Herb Capozzi died of cancer on November 21, 2011 at age 86.

 

==YouTube==

The Whitecaps vs. Montreal Manic at Olympic Stadium in Montreal. August 1, 1981

 

==Links==

North American Soccer League Media Guides

North American Soccer League Programs

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Written by andycrossley

February 16th, 2015 at 4:19 am

March 17, 1984 – Cleveland Force vs. Pittsburgh Spirit

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Dave MacKenzie Pittsburgh SpiritCleveland Force vs. Pittsburgh Spirit
March 17, 1984
Richfield Coliseum
Attendance: 19,048

Major Indoor Soccer League Programs

 

Cleveland-Pittsburgh isn’t just a great rivalry in the NFL.  Back in the early 1980’s, the two cities had a fierce rivalry in indoor soccer, of all things.  The Pittsburgh Spirit, owned by Pittsburgh Penguins boss Edward DeBartolo Sr., were relatively popular, claiming similar crowds to the pre-Lemieux Pens.  Meanwhile, after several glum years at the box office, the Cleveland Force became a late-blooming hit, packing huge crowds into the Richfield Coliseum by 1983.

The Spirit-Force rivalry burned hottest during the 1983-84 season. Both clubs were virtually unbeatable at home and the two teams stayed neck-and-neck in the Eastern Division of the Major Indoor Soccer League (MISL) throughout the winter.  Together with a third Eastern Division foe, the Baltimore Blast, the trio were easily the three best clubs in the MISL.

The standing room-only crowd of 19,048 was a regular season record for the Cleveland Force and the 5th largest crowd in history for the MISL at the time.  The home town fans would go home disappointed.  Ian Sybis netted a hat trick for Pittsburgh and Polish defender Adam Topolski added a goal and three assists en route to a 6-4 win for the visitors.

The Force would take their revenge in the postseason.  The clubs finished with near identical records.  Pittsburgh in 2nd place at 32-16 (19-5 at home) and Cleveland right behind at 31-17 (18-6 at home).  But in the quarterfinal playoffs, the Force easily dispatched the Spirit 3 games to 1 in a best-of-five series.

The Cleveland-Pittsburgh soccer rivalry dissolved when the Pittsburgh Spirit went out of business in April 1986.  The Cleveland Force followed two years, shutting down in July 1988.

 

==Links==

Cleveland Force Home Page

Pittsburgh Spirit Home Page

##

 

 

Written by andycrossley

February 15th, 2015 at 2:27 pm