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2001-2003 New York Power

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2001 New York Power Media GuideWomen’s United Soccer Association (2001-2003)

Born: April 2000 – WUSA founding franchise
Folded: September 15, 2003

Stadium: Mitchel Athletic Complex (10,102)

Team Colors: Violet, Gold & Black

Mascot: Zap

Investor-Operator: Time-Warner Cable

Founders Cup Championships: None

 

The Power were the New York entry in the Women’s United Soccer Association, the first attempt at a pro soccer league for women in the United States. The club played on Long Island at the Mitchell Athletic Complex in Uniondale.

The Power fared well in the WUSA’s debut season of 2001. U.S. National Team striker Tiffeny Milbrett led the league in scoring and took home MVP and Offensive Player-of-the-Year honors for the league. Her 16 goals established a league record that was never equalled. Other key players included Milbrett’s USWNT teammates Christie Pearce and Sara Whalen, Norwegian international defender Gro Espeseth and Chinese National Team keeper Gao Hong.  The Power finished in 3rd place with a 9-7-5 record. They lost to the eventual champion Bay Area CyberRays in the playoff semi-final.

The club fell apart during an cursed 2002 campaign. Espeseth retired. Hong and Pearce missed time with injuries. Worst of all, Whalen suffered a career-ending knee injury and nearly died from post-surgery complications. The Power crashed to a last place finish. Their 3-17-1 record was the worst in the three-year history of the WUSA. New York also finished last in the league in attendance with announced figures of 5,575 per game.

The Power hobbled into the WUSA’s third and final season in 2003. Behind the scenes, WUSA officials quietly asked senior management of the league’s Boston Breakers franchise to oversee operations of the Power front office. On the field, the club bounced back somewhat under new Head Coach Tom Sermanni, finishing 5th with a 7-9-5 record. Match attendance dipped further to a league-worst 4,249 per game.

Shortly after the conclusion of the 2003 WUSA season, the league’s cable company backers pulled their support. The Power and the rest of the WUSA went out of business on September 15, 2003.

 

New York Power Memorabilia

 

New York Power Video

2001 WUSA playoff semi-final. Power visit the Bay Area CyberRays at Spartan Stadium. August 18, 2001

 

Links

Women’s United Soccer Association Media Guides

Women’s United Soccer Association Programs

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Written by Drew Crossley

March 11th, 2017 at 9:52 pm

2001-2003 Philadelphia Charge

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2001 Philadelphia Charge Media GuideWomen’s United Soccer Association (2001-2003)

Founded
: April 10, 2000 – WUSA founding franchise
Folded: September 15, 2003

Stadium: Villanova Stadium (11,800)

Team Colors: Red & Black

Investor-Operator: Comcast

Founders Cup Championships: None

 

The Philadelphia Charge were a three-year entry in the Women’s United Soccer Association (2001-2003), the first pro soccer league for women in the United States.

The big impact players on the Charge were the team’s foreign stars – striker Marinette Pichon of France and midfielder/forward Kelly Smith of England. Pichon won the WUSA’s Most Valuable Player award in 2002. Smith, though limited by injuries during her Charge days, is widely considered one of the greatest offensive forces in the history of the women’s game.

But the big drawing cards of the WUSA were the American stars.  The league was formed by a consortium of cable companies and executives who were intoxicated by the attendance and TV ratings of the 1999 Women’s World Cup, won by the USA women.  Comcast backed the Charge franchise. Each of the eight WUSA franchises was “allocated” three of the U.S. National Team members in late 2000. The allocations were conducted via a matching process that took into account both team and player desires. The big name American stars (Mia Hamm, Julie Foudy, Brandi Chastain, et al.) expressed no willingness to play in Philly. As a result, the Charge received the least impressive allocation of U.S. National Team players among the WUSA’s eight clubs: Mandy Clemens, Lorrie Fair and Saskia Webber.

Heather Mitts Philadelphia Charge

Heather Mitts Bobblehead Night. June 8, 2002

The breakout American star turned out to be a college draft pick: defender Heather Mitts from the University of Florida. Mitts was a stalwart for the Charge during the three-year run of the WUSA, appearing in 51 of the team’s 63 matches and earning all-league honors as a defender in 2003. Off the field, Mitts appeared on the cover of Philadelphia Magazine as one of the city’s sexiest singles and dated Philadelphia Phillies outfielder Pat Burrell and later Eagles quarterback A.J. Feeley (whom she married in 2010). Mitts went on to play 137 games with the U.S. National Team, earning an Olympic gold medal with the team in 2008.

During the WUSA’s final season, the Charge drafted goalkeeper Hope Solo out of the University of Washington. Solo would eventually become the greatest American goalkeeper of all-time and a World Cup and Olympic champion. But as a rookie with the Charge in 2003, she spent most of the season on the bench backing up Melissa Moore.

Solo would never get a chance to establish herself as one of the rising young stars of the league. Late in the 2003 season, rumors emerged that Comcast was through backing the Charge, throwing the team’s future in Philly into question. In fact, Comcast’s desire to get out was a symptom of a broader loss of investor confidence in the WUSA.  On September 15th, 2003 the league folded after three seasons of play, taking the Charge down along with it.

 

Philadelphia Charge Memorabilia

 

Philadelphia Charge Video

 

Links

Women’s United Soccer Association Media Guides

Women’s United Soccer Association Programs

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Written by Drew Crossley

May 24th, 2016 at 2:05 am

2001-2003 Boston Breakers

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2002 Boston BreakersWomen’s United Soccer Association (2001-2003)

Born: April 10, 2000 – WUSA founding franchise
Folded: September 15, 2003.

Stadium: Nickerson Field (10,000)

Team Colors: Breaker Blue, Sea Silver & Surf White

Investor-Operator: Amos Hostetter

 

The original Boston Breakers soccer club was a founding member of the Women’s United Soccer Association (WUSA) from 2001 to 2003.  The WUSA was the first professional soccer league for women in North America, backed by a consortium of cable television companies and executives who were intrigued by the groundbreaking success of the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup, hosted by the United States.  The Breakers franchise was backed by Amos Hostetter, the billionaire co-founder of Continental Cablevision.

The provenance of the team’s name was somewhat odd.  Like many fledgling sports teams, the soon-to-be-Boston Breakers instituted a Name-The-Team contest.  The winning entry was attributed to a 15-year old teenage girl from suburban Easton, Massachusetts.  What was strange about the  choice was that Boston already had a high profile pro sports flop that had used the same identity in the recent past.  The Boston Breakers of the United States Football League had even used a similar blue/white color scheme and played in the very same stadium (Boston University’s Nickerson Field) as the new women’s soccer team.  The football Breakers came and went in a single season in 1983 – very much in the living memory of countless local sports fans and Boston’s sporting press.

But “Breakers” it was to be.  In May of 2000, each of the eight WUSA franchises received three players from the United States Women’s National Team tha captivated the nation during the World Cup ten months earlier.  The U.S. National Teamers – known as “Founders” since they also had a small equity stake in the league – were meant to form both the talent nucleus and the marketing tent poles for each franchise.  The Breakers received All-Universe midfielder Kristine Lilly and stalwart defender Kate Sobrero.  The team’s third allocation, however, was a bust.  Tracy Ducar, the USWNT’s reserve goalkeeper, suffered an eye-injury late in the WUSA’s 2001 debut season and was thereafter unseated by less-heralded Canadian National Team goalkeeper Karina LeBlanc for the Breakers starting job.

Dagny Mellgren Boston BreakersThe burden of scoring goals fell to the Breakers’ international signings.  Boston received German National Team stars Maren Meinert and Bettina Wiegmann along with the Norwegian duo of Ragnhild Gulbrandsen (who would join in 2002) and Dagny Mellgren.  Though Gulbrandsen would disappoint and Wiegmann retired after two seasons, Meinert and Mellgren quickly emerged as premier scoring threats, with Lilly often setting the table with deft assists.

Despite fine individual performances from the likes of Lilly, Meinert, Mellgren and a previously unheralded University of Virginia midfielder named Angela Hucles, the Breakers disappointed as a team during the first two seasons of the WUSA.  Under Head Coach Jay Hoffman, the team finished 6th place and out of the playoffs in both campaigns.  The Breakers were also something of a Jekyll & Hyde club – virtually unbeatable at home, where they had established one of the most loyal followings in the WUSA, but unable to perform consistently on the road.

The club’s fortunes turned in 2003 with the hiring of Swedish manager Pia Sundhage to take over for Hoffman.  The Breakers finally became a tough road team, equaling their success at home.  Meinert was phenomenal at the top of the attack, winning league Most Valuable Player honors.  At 10-4-7, the Breakers finished top of the table in the WUSA’s regular season.  However, Boston was bounced on penalty kicks in the playoff semi-final by the eventual league champion Washington Freedom.

Boston Breakers ProgramOne month later, the WUSA abruptly closed its doors on September 15, 2003.  There were inklings that the league was in trouble.  The league cut roster sizes from 18 to 16 following the 2002 season and dropped the salary cap from $834,500 to $595,750.  The “Founders” (mostly) accepted large pay cuts.  But it wasn’t enough.  While attendance was not far off from expectations, corporate sponsorship for the league never hit critical mass.  Still, the timing of the shutdown shocked many outside observers, coming just five days before the start of the 2003 Women’s World Cup – which would be held in the United States once again, thanks to the SARS outbreak creating havoc in China, the original host of the tournament.

A lackluster effort to revive corporate support for the WUSA through a series of neutral-site “festivals” in the summer of 2004 flopped.  From 2008 through 2008, there was no top-flight women’s pro soccer league in North America.  When a new league – Women’s Professional Soccer (WPS) – began play in 2009, a franchise was quickly awarded to Boston, based upon the warm reception to the WUSA-era Breakers club.  The WPS franchise revived the Breakers name and logo.  The “New” Breakers of 2009 included three veterans of the original 2001-2003 Breakers club – Angela Hucles, Kristine Lilly and seldom-used Mary-Frances Monroe.  The team also featured several front office holdovers who returned to work for the new club, including Team President Joe Cummings, who launched both editions of the team.

The new/2009 edition of the Breakers remains active today as a member of the National Women’s Soccer League.

 

==Slideshow==

 

==Boston Breakers Programs on Fun While It Lasted==

Season Date Opponent Score Program Other

2001

2001 5/5/2001 vs. Atlanta Beat L 1-0 Game Ticket
2001 6/3/2001 vs. New York Power L 3-2 Program
2001 6/6/2001 vs. Atlanta Beat T 1-1 Program
2001 6/9/2001 @ San Diego Spirit L 3-1 Program
2001 6/16/2001 vs. Washington Freedom W 1-0 Program
2001 7/12/2001 vs. Carolina Courage W 2-1 Program
2001 7/21/2001 vs. Carolina Courage L 2-1 Program
2001 7/26/2001 @ New York Power L 4-2 Program
2001 7/29/2001 vs. Washington Freedom W 2-1 Program

2002

2002 4/20/2002 vs. Atlanta Beat W 3-1 Program
2002 6/1/2002 vs. Washington Freedom T 0-0 Program
2002 6/8/2002 vs. Carolina Courage T 2-2 Program
2002 6/12/2002 @ Washington Freedom L 2-1 Program
2002 6/22/2002 vs. New York Power W 5-2 Program
2002 6/29/2002 vs. San Jose CyberRays T 1-1 Program
2002 7/10/2002 vs. San Diego Spirit W 3-2 Program
2002 7/24/2002 @ Washington Freedom T 1-1 Program
2002 8/4/2002 vs. New York Power W 4-1 Program
2002 8/10/2002 vs. San Jose CyberRays  W 1-0 Program

2003

2003 4/12/2003 @ Atlanta Beat L 6-0 Program
2003 6/8/2003 @ Washington Freedom W 3-1 Program
2003 6/21/2003 vs. Carolina Courage L 1-0 Program
2003 6/25/2003 vs. New York Power W 2-1 Program

 

 

==Key Players==

 

==YouTube==

2002 Boston Breakers In-Stadium Video Montage  (starts around 0:18)…

 

==Links==

Women’s United Soccer Association Media Guides

Women’s United Soccer Association Programs

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2001-2003 San Jose CyberRays

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2003 San Jose Cyberrays Media GuideWomen’s United Soccer Association (2001-2003)

Born: 2000 – WUSA founding franchise
Folded: September 15, 2003

Stadium: Spartan Stadium (16,000)

Team Colors: Dark Purple, Light Purple, Orange & Black

Investor/Operators: John Hendricks & Amos Hostetter

Founders Cup Champions: 2001

 

In the relatively short history and small sample size of women’s professional team sports in North America, I’d hand the Weirdest Name prize to the Bay Area CyberRays of the Women’s United Soccer Association.  After their debut season, in the summer of 2001, WUSA officials came to realize it was an appallingly stupid name and they changed it … to the San Jose CyberRays.

But anyway, back to that first season.  The team was actually pretty damn good under the direction of former Stanford coach Ian Sawyers.  The big star was the 1999 U.S. World Cup hero Brandi Chastain, but the offense was powered by a pair of standout Brazilians: midfielder Sissi (10 assists) and forward Katia (7 goals).  Australian Julie Murray was the team’s leading scorer with 9 tallies.

CyberRays advanced to the 2001 Founders Cup final and won the first WUSA championship by defeating the Atlanta Beat on penalty kicks before 21,078 fans at Foxboro Stadium in Massachusetts on August 25, 2001.  Murray scored in regulation and converted the final PK to earn Player of the Match honors in her final pro match before retirement.

The CyberRays were unable to recapture their first season form and missed the WUSA playoffs in 2002 and 2003.  (Maybe it’s bad mojo to change your name, however slightly, immediately after winning the championship.)

The CyberRays were somewhat of an orphan club from inception.  The team was jointly operated in the centrally-owned WUSA by cable TV barons Amos Hostetter and John Hendricks.  Both men lived on the Eastern seaboard and were more actively engaged with the WUSA franchises they operated in their local communities – Hostetter with his Boston Breakers and Hendricks with the league’s flagship Washington Freedom franchise.  According to Sports Business Journal the pair were actively seeking to unload the CyberRays to local investors in 2003, but couldn’t find any takers.  One rumored scenario had the club moving to Los Angeles for the 2004 season under the management of Anschutz Entertainment Group, owners of the Los Angeles Galaxy of Major League Soccer.  But instead the entire WUSA went out of business on September 15th, 2003, rendering the matter moot.

Women’s pro soccer returned to the Bay Area with the formation of FC Gold Pride of Women’s Professional Soccer in 2009.  Like the CyberRays, F.C. Gold Pride also won a league championship.  But they too were short-lived and folded after just two seasons.

 

San Jose CyberRays Memorabilia

 

San Jose CyberRays Video

60-second radio spot promoting what turned out to be the final CyberRays game ever played, August 10, 2003.

 

Links

Women’s United Soccer Association Media Guides

Women’s United Soccer Association Programs

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September 14, 2002 – Michelle Akers Testimonial Match

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Michelle Akers Boston Breakers

Photo courtesy of Tony Biscaia

Boston Breakers vs. Washington Freedom
Michelle Akers Testimonial Match
September 14, 2002
Nickerson Field
Attendance: 10,279

 

We’re preparing to put our house on the market, so I’ve been rifling some old boxes from my women’s pro soccer adventures in the course of clearing out the attic.  I came across this gem on a beat-up old VHS tape…

This is the in-stadium tribute video created by the original Boston Breakers of the Women’s United Soccer Association (WUSA) for Michelle Akers farewell/testimonial match in September 2002.  (Scroll to the bottom of this post for the video embed).

Akers was arguably the first transcendent star of the U.S. Women’s National Team program.  A Hermann Trophy winner, Olympic gold medalist, two-time World Cup champion and FIFA’s Female Player of the Century.  The WUSA attracted investors and got off the ground thanks in part to Akers’ heroics during the 1990’s, and the tens of thousands of young girls and women inspired by both her relentless, physical playing style and by her battle with chronic fatigue syndrome throughout her career.

But by the time WUSA launched in April 2001, Akers was 35 years old and retired from international play.  She had had 13 knee surgeries, several concussions, and faced her fourth and fifth shoulder operations in 2001.  She was the only player among 20 so-called “Founders” of the WUSA – top players from the U.S. National Team pool who were given an equity stake in the league – who didn’t play during the 2001 inaugural season.  In October 2001, Akers announced her final retirement from soccer and that she had abandoned her hopes of playing in the WUSA.

Michelle Akers WUSA

Photo Courtesy of Tony Biscaia

11 months later, on September 14, 2002, the Boston Breakers hosted a postseason Testimonial Match to honor Akers’ legendary career.  For one night only, Akers would don her old number 10 for the Boston Breakers.  The opponents were the WUSA’s Washington Freedom who brought with them the biggest drawing card in the women’s game – Akers’ former U.S. teammate Mia Hamm.  At the time, Hamm and Akers were the top two scorers in the history of the U.S. National Team.

The exhibition had huge appeal in Boston.  Akers, Hamm and Breakers’ star Kristine Lilly threw out ceremonial first pitches at the Boston Red Sox game the night before.  The Testimonial Match sold out Nickerson Field in advance.  In fact, the crowd of 10,279 was the second largest in the 9-year history of the various incarnations of the Breakers, trailing only the club’s inaugural WUSA game in May 2001.

The Breakers won the match 1-0.  An interesting footnote – the Breakers finished a disappointing 2002 campaign a month earlier and fired Head Coach Jay Hoffman.  The club’s new Head Coach would be Pia Sundhage, the Swedish-born manager who would later lead a restoration of the U.S. National Team program from 2008 to 2012.  It would have been a compelling cross roads – the dominant star of the 1990’s in her final match and the woman who would become one of the key figures for U.S. Soccer in the early 21st century managing her first game (albeit an exhibition) in the States.   But as it was, Sundhage hadn’t arrived in Boston yet and the Breakers were guest-managed on this evening by former Harvard coach Jape Shattuck.

 

==YouTube==

Michelle Akers Tribute Video, played in-stadium during halftime of her Testimonial Match at Nickerson Field.

 

==Links==

Boston Breakers Home Page

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