Lively Tales About Dead Teams

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Washington Darts vs. Bangu. August 8, 1971

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Washington Darts ProgramWashington Darts vs. Bangu (Brazil)
August 8, 1971
Catholic University Stadium
Attendance: 4,403

North American Soccer League Programs
8 Pages

 

Rare match day sheet for a 1971 international match between the short-lived Washington Darts (1968-1971) of the North American Soccer League and visiting Bangu of Brazil.  Bangu was a frequent visitor to the States in the late 1960’s and early 70’s.  In 1967 the Brazilian club spent most of their summer offseason in Texas, moonlighting as the “Houston Stars” in the United Soccer Association, a league that imported foreign clubs to play under Americanized names.

This match, held at the 7,000 Catholic University Stadium, was part of a short U.S. tour by Bangu in 1971.  The struggling NASL was down to just eight clubs in 1971 and relied on international matches to both generate interest and fill out the schedule.  So this match wasn’t a friendly – it actually counted in the regular season standings.

The result was a 2-2 draw.  The Darts got goals from Tibor Szalay and Warren Archibald, but couldn’t hold a 2-1 second half lead. Bangu’s goals came from Edson Bonfim and Amauri Da Silva.

The debt-ridden Darts club would play only two more home matches after this date with Bangu.  The team was sold in the offseason and moved to Miami where it became the Miami Gatos in 1972.

 

==Links==

More NASL International Friendlies

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Written by andycrossley

March 13th, 2015 at 1:55 pm

1974-1984 Vancouver Whitecaps

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Vancouver Whitecaps Media GuideNorth American Soccer League (1974-1984)

Born: December 11, 1973 – NASL expansion franchise.
Died: January 1985 – The Whitecaps cease operations.

Stadiums:

Arenas:

  • 1980-1981: Pacific Coliseum
  • 1981-1982: PNE Agrodome
  • 1983-1984: Pacific Coliseum

Team Colors:

Owners:

 

The original Vancouver Whitecaps were British Columbia’s beloved pro soccer club of the 1970’s and early 1980’s.  The club competed in the North American Soccer League from 1974 until 1984.  The ‘Caps also brought an attractive slate of international exhibitions to Vancouver, importing top foreign clubs such as Fluminense, Manchester City, Manchester United, Rangers and Roma for friendly matches and tournaments.  From 1980 to 1984, the Whitecaps played indoor soccer during the winter months.

Vancouver Whitecaps Media GuideOne of the NASL’s top clubs during the late 1970’s, the Whitecaps finest hour came at the conclusion of the 1979 season.  The Whitecaps dispatched the two-time defending champion New York Cosmos in the playoff semi-finals.  Then, on the Cosmos’ home ground at Giants Stadium in New Jersey, the Whitecaps beat the Tampa Bay Rowdies 2-1 in Soccer Bowl ’79 to capture their first and only title.  An estimated 100,000 fans gathered in downtown Vancouver for a parade to honor the team.

Midway through the 1983 season, the Whitecaps left their long-time home at Empire Stadium to move into the 60,000-seat B.C. Place stadium.  The team’s first game at B.C. Place on June 20, 1983 drew 60,342 fans, which set a Canadian pro soccer attendance record which would stand for three decades.

But attendance in the new dome dipped quickly and by the start of the 1984 season, original founder Herb Capozzi had turned over controlling interest in the team to oil millionaire Bob Carter.  Carter’s reign was an embarrassment.  With the club bleeding millions of dollars, Carter made noises about folding the club in the middle of the 1984 NASL season.  The ‘Caps would end up finishing out the year, knocked out in the playoff semi-finals by the Chicago Sting.  While the ‘Caps were playing out what would be their final games in late 1984, Carter was busy getting himself into hot water for lurid S&M hijinks with a pair of underage prostitutes.

Deep in debt, and with the rest of the NASL collapsing around it, the Whitecaps declared bankruptcy in January 1985 and went out of business.  The Whitecaps name was revived in 2001 and the “new” Whitecaps now compete in Major League Soccer.

 

==Slideshow==

 

 

 

==Vancouver Whitecaps Programs on Fun While It Lasted==

Season Date Opponent Score Program Other

1974

1974 7/7/1974 vs. St. Louis Stars W 2-1 (SO) Program

1975

1975 5/28/1975 @ New York Cosmos W 1-0 Program
1975 7/3/1975 @ Portland Timbers  L 2-1 Program

1976

1976 5/16/1976 @ San Jose Earthquakes L 2-0 Program
1976 5/19/1976 vs. Rangers T 2-2 Program
1976 7/7/1976 vs. San Jose Earthquakes L 1-0 Program
1976 7/27/1976 vs. Borussia Moenchengladbach W 4-3 Program

1977

1977 4/8/1977 vs. Portland Timbers  L 1-0 Program
1977 6/30/1977 vs. New York Cosmos W 5-3 Program
1977 7/5/1977 vs. Seattle Sounders W 1-0 Program

1978

1978 6/22/1978 vs. Tulsa Roughnecks W 5-1 Program
1978 8/12/1978 @ Portland Timbers  L 1-0 Program

1979

1979 3/30/1979 vs. Dallas Tornado L 2-0 (SO) Program
1979 6/10/1979 @ Minnesota Kicks L 1-0 Program
1979 7/15/1979 @ New York Cosmos W 4-2 Program
1979 8/18/1979 vs. Dallas Tornado W 2-1 Program
1979 9/8/1979 Tampa Bay Rowdies W 2-1 Program

1980

1980 5/21/1980 vs. A.S. Roma T 1-1 Program
1980 5/24/1980 vs. Manchester City W 5-0 Program Video
1980 6/29/1980 vs. New York Cosmos L 3-0 Program
1980 7/6/1980 vs. Rochester Lancers L 3-1 Program

1981

1981 4/18/1981 @ Portland Timbers  W 2-1 (OT) Program
1981 5/11/1981 vs. West Bromwich Albion W 2-1 Program
1981 6/3/1981 vs. Manchester City W 2-0 Program
1981 6/6/1981 vs. Calgary Boomers L 3-2 (SO) Program
1981 6/29/1981 vs. Napoli T 1-1 Program
1981 7/12/1981 @ Chicago Sting L 2-1 (OT) Program
1981 7/15/1981 vs. Sparta Rotterdam W 4-0 Program
1981 8/12/1981 vs. Seattle Sounders W 5-0 Program
1981 8/19/1981 vs. San Jose Earthquakes W 3-1 Program
1981 8/26/1981 vs. Tampa Bay Rowdies L 1-0 Program
1981 10/11/1981 @ Nottingham Forest T 2-2 Program 1
1981 10/11/1981  @ Nottingham Forest T 2-2 Program 2

1982

1982 3/23/1982 vs. Borussia Moenchengladbach ?? Program
1982 6/19/1982 @ Chicago Sting W 3-2 (Shootout) Program
1982 6/23/1982 @ New York Cosmos L 3-2 Program

1983

1983 6/20/1983 vs. Seattle Sounders W 2-1 Program
1983 8/6/1983 vs. Seattle Sounders L 2-1 Program
1983 9/8/1983 vs. Toronto Blizzard W 1-0 Program

1983-84 (Indoor)

1983-84 12/30/1983 @ Chicago Sting L 7-3 Program
1983-84 1/13/1984 @ Chicago Sting L 4-3 (OT) Program

1984

1984 5/20/1984 @ New York Cosmos L 2-1 Program
1984 5/23/1984 vs. Golden Bay Earthquakes W 5-3 Program
1984 5/27/1984 vs. Ajax L 2-1 Program
1984 6/6/1984 vs. Fluminense W 3-1 Program
1984 6/27/1984 vs. Chicago Sting W 1-0 Program
1984 8/29/1984 @ New York Cosmos L 2-1 Program
1984 9/18/1984 @ Chicago Sting W 1-0 (OT) Program
1984 9/23/1984 vs. Chicago Sting L 3-1 Program

 

==Key Players==

 

==In Memoriam==

Alan Ball (Whitecaps ’79-’80) died April 25, 2007 of a heart attack while fighting a fire in his home. Daily Telegraph obituary.

Former Whitecaps GM Peter Bridgwater (’79-’83) passed away from cancer on June 21, 2005.  Soccer America obituary.

Whitecaps founder and long-time owner Herb Capozzi died of cancer on November 21, 2011 at age 86.

 

==YouTube==

The Whitecaps vs. Montreal Manic at Olympic Stadium in Montreal. August 1, 1981

 

==Links==

North American Soccer League Media Guides

North American Soccer League Programs

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Written by andycrossley

February 16th, 2015 at 4:19 am

1967-1968 Chicago Mustangs

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Chicago Mustangs Media GuideUnited Soccer Association (1967)
North American Soccer League (1968)

Born: 1967 – USA founding franchise.
Died: 1968 – The Mustangs cease operations

Stadium: Comiskey Park

Team Colors:

Owner: Arthur Allyn Jr.

 

The Chicago Mustangs soccer club was a charter member of the United Soccer Association, a mid-1960’s effort to launch a first division professional league here in the States.  There were 12 member franchises representing 10 U.S. cities, plus Toronto and Vancouver.  Most of the clubs were backed by heavy-hitter investors from Major League Baseball, the NFL and the National Hockey League.  The owner of the Mustangs was Chicago White Sox boss Arthur Allyn Jr. and the soccer club played in Allyn’s South Side baseball stadium, Comiskey Park.

The founders of the United Soccer Association intended to begin play in 1968, but they felt compelled to bump their plans up a year when a rival circuit, the National Professional Soccer League, signed a TV contract with CBS and decided to start play in 1967.  With the accelerated timetable, the USA decided to import entire foreign clubs from Europe and South America to represent the league’s 12 cities in 1967.  The Chicago Mustangs were actually Cagliari Calcio, from the Mediterranean island of Sardinia.  Cagliari was enjoying a run of success in the Italian Serie A at the time – they would win their only Scudetto in 1970.  However, the Italians did not bring all of their stars to Chicago.  Gigi Riva, the greatest player in club history and the all-time leading scorer for the Italian National Team, stayed home.

The Mustangs/Cagliari struggled through their only season in the United Soccer Association.  The club finished out of the postseason hunt with a 3-7-2 record.  Attendance was dismal too, with an announced match average of just 4,207 at Comiskey.  A bright spot was 23-year old striker Roberto Boninsegna, who led the circuit in scoring with 10 goals in 9 appearances.  Boninsegna would go on to score Italy’s only goal in the 1970 World Cup final against Brazil.

After the 1967 season concluded in financial ruin for both the USA and the NPSL, the former rivals merged to form the North American Soccer League (NASL) in 1968.  That meant the contraction of one franchise in Chicago, as both leagues fielded a Windy City franchise in 1967.  The NPSL’s Chicago Spurs, based out of Soldier Field, moved to Kansas City, so the Mustangs continued on for a second season in 1968.   Cagliari and the other foreign ringer clubs would not return.  In 1968, all of the NASL clubs built their own rosters.

The all-new, multi-ethnic Mustangs were much improved in 1968.  Polish émigré Janusz Michalik led the NASL with 30 goals and 9 assists and won league MVP honors.  The club improved to 13-10-9, but this wasn’t quite good enough for playoff spot.  Attendance continued to be terrible though, dipping to under 2,500 fans per game at 45,000-seat Comiskey Park.

The NASL nearly folded after the 1968 season.  Membership shrunk for 17 clubs in 1968 to just 5 survivors for 1969.  The Mustangs were one of the casualties, withdrawing from the league in late 1968.  A semi-pro version of the Mustangs reportedly continued to play into the 1970’s.

Don’t miss Vadim Furmanov’s “A Sardinian Summer: the Forgotten Story of the Chicago Mustangs” over at Café Futbol.

 

==Chicago Mustangs Matches on Fun While It Lasted==

Season Date Opponent Score Program Other
1967 6/4/1967 @ Washington Whips T 1-1 Program
1968 5/8/1968  @ Los Angeles Wolves T 1-1 Program
1968 7/14/1968 @ New York Generals L 4-3 Program

 

==Key Players==

  • Roberto Boninsegna
  • Janusz Kowalik

 

==In Memoriam==

Former Mustangs owner Arthur Allyn Jr. passed away on March 22, 1985 at age 71.

 

==Links==

A Sardinian Summer: the Forgotten Story of the Chicago Mustangs“, Vadim Furmanov, Café Futbol, August 7, 2013.

From Amateur to MVP: Janusz Kowalik and the Chicago Mustangs“, Grant Czubinski, A Moment of Brilliance, February 11, 2014

North American Soccer League Media Guides

North American Soccer League Programs

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Written by andycrossley

December 20th, 2014 at 9:01 pm

May 10, 1981 – Chicago Sting vs. Dallas Tornado

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George Best San Jose EarthquakesChicago Sting vs. Dallas Tornado
May 10, 1981
Wrigley Field
Attendance: 1,861

North American Soccer League Programs

 

We’ve already got a ton of Chicago Sting programs posted on FWIL, but I’ll throw another one on here just as an excuse to add a new George Best game day mag to the archive. Best, playing his final season in U.S. in 1981, is pictured on the cover of the afternoon’s match program as a member of the San Jose Earthquakes, the last of the three NASL clubs he played for during his five-year American adventure.

Best and the rest of the ‘Quakes were hundreds of miles from Chicago’s Wrigley Field on this Mother’s Day afternoon and that was to their immense good fortune.  Wind, rain and temperatures in the 30’s left Sting officials eager to re-schedule the match, despite the opportunity to curb stomp what was easily the worst side in the NASL in 1981: Lamar Hunt’s Dallas Tornado.  The Tornado were the last remaining active club from the NASL’s first season back in 1968, but were suffering through a miserable 5-27 campaign that would ultimately end with the club’s closure in September 1981.

Rudy Glenn Chicago StingThe shivering assembly of 1,861 souls at Wrigley may have been smallest NASL crowd of the post-Pele era.  (Anybody know for sure? Comment below).  On the plus side, no one had to rush the gates early to claim one of the 1,000 daisies set aside for Mother’s Day or the 5,000 t-shirts sponsored by R.C. Cola.  The weather was so nasty (and the pre-sale presumably so grim) that Sting executive Charles Evranian called Tornado General Manager Kent Kramer three hours before kickoff to suggest postponing the match until the next day.  Kramer dismissed the proposal, but his players seemed to feel differently.  Although the match went off as scheduled, the Tornado never seemed to get off the bus.

Rudy Glenn, the second-year American midfielder from Indiana University, was the offensive hero for Chicago.  Glenn scored the first and last goals for Chicago in a 5-0 blowout.  It was the first multi-goal performance of Glenn’s outdoor career.  It’s not clear if he ever did it again – the Oklahoma native scored just 13 more goals in his 130-game NASL career.   Glenn would, however, score the decisive penalty kick to win Soccer Bowl ’81 for the Sting over the New York Cosmos four months later in September 1981.

 

==Links==

Chicago Sting Home Page

Dallas Tornado Home Page

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Written by andycrossley

November 29th, 2014 at 10:49 pm

July 6, 1983 – New York Cosmos vs. Team America

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Laurie Abrahams Tulsa RoughnecksNew York Cosmos vs. Team America
July 6, 1983
Giants Stadium
Attendance: 35,228

North American Soccer League Programs
88 Pages

 

A patriotic soccer double-header at the Meadowlands on this July evening in 1983.  A Pan American Games qualifier between the United States and Canada opened the show at 6:30 PM, followed by a North American Soccer League match between the New York Cosmos and Team America.  Team America was a new side in the NASL, the so-called “National Team in Training” of the United States, which was disastrously inserted as a privately-owned club team into the league’s 1983 schedule.

The amateurs took the field first with the sun still lingering over Giants Stadium.  This two-leg series against Canada was the final Pan-Am Games qualifier for Manfred Schellscheidt’s United States team.  Only one of the two CONCACAF members would advance to the Games in Venezuela at the end of August.  They fought to a draw on this night, with each side tallying early in the first half and then holding on for a 1-1 tie.  The U.S. would best Canada four nights later at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario to earn the qualification.

Julio Cesar Romero New York CosmosIn the nightcap, the Cosmos ran roughshod over Alkis Panagoulias’ ramshackle collection of young American pros and Green Card recipients.  Paraguayan midfield magician Julio Cesar Romero ran the show, scoring one goal and setting up three others.  The Cosmos won 4-0, despite losing the NASL’s all-time leading scorer, Giorgio Chinaglia, to a severe hamstring pull early in the 2nd half.

An interesting moment occurred late in the match when Team America’s 21-year old captain Jeff Durgan knocked down New York’s Rick Davis, drawing a yellow card.  Durgan was one of three players under contract to the Cosmos who were selected to play for Team America in 1983, along with Boris Bandov and Chico Borja.  Davis was also chosen for Team America, but refused the assignment, opting to remain with the Cosmos.  Team America’s demoralizing performance in the NASL was partially blamed on the refusal of a handful of the league’s young American stars, including Davis and Mark Peterson of the Seattle Sounders, to leave their clubs and join Team America.

The failure to procure the actual best American players to play for Team America ultimately helped to doom the team  After a grim 10-20 record and big financial losses playing out of a home base at RFK Stadium in Washington, D.C., the Team American experiment was euthanized a few days after the NASL regular season ended in September 1983.

Laurie Abrahams of the Tulsa Roughnecks was pictured on the cover of the evening’s KICK game program (above right).

 

==Cosmos vs. Team America Downloads==

July 6, 1983 New York Cosmos Game Notes

July 6, 1983 Team America Game Notes

 

==United States vs. Canada Downloads==

July 6, 1983 United States Soccer Federation USA vs. Canada Fact Sheet

July 6, 1983 United States Pan American Team Roster

July 6, 1983 Canada Pan American Team Roster

July 6, 1983 United States Player Bios

 

==Links==

New York Cosmos Home Page

Team America Home Page

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