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2001-2003 Atlanta Beat

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Women’s United Soccer Association (2001-2003)

Born: April 10, 2000 – WUSA founding franchise.
Folded: September 15, 2003

Stadiums:

Team Colors: Columbia Blue, Purple & Sea Foam Green

Investor/Operator: Cox Enterprises, Inc.

 

Perhaps the best all-around team in the pioneering Women’s United Soccer Association, the Atlanta Beat were the only club to make the playoffs in all three of the WUSA’s seasons, but they never captured a championship.  The Beat advanced to the title match twice, losing Founder Cup I to the Bay Area CyberRays in 2001 and losing the third and final Founders Cup to the Washington Freedom in 2003.

Under Head Coach Tom Stone, the Beat boasted a strong attack with Canadian international Charmaine Hooper and U.S. World Cup veteran Cindy Parlow up top and Japanese star Homare Sawa organizing the midfield.  Chinese superstar Sun Wen – FIFA’s Female Player-of-the-Century, along with Michelle Akers – was expected to be a major star for Atlanta, but was limited to only five starts by injuries in 2001 and retired from club play after the 2002 season.  Nevertheless, Wen regained her form in the 2001 playoffs, helping lead the Beat to the final and scoring a goal in the championship game.

The defense was even stingier, conceding the fewest goals in the WUSA’s inaugural season. Goalkeeper Briana Scurry was one of the Beat’s most recognizable stars, having backstopped the United States in their thrilling World Cup final victory over Sun Wen’s Chinese team in 1999.

The 2001 Beat had the league’s best regular season record in 2001 at 10-4-7.   The playoffs were terrific, with the Beat escaping the Philadelphia Charge 3-2 in the semis thanks to a golden goal by Cindy Parlow.  That earned the Beat a trip to face the Bay Area CyberRays at Founders Cup I at Foxboro Stadium in Massachusetts.  Atlanta and Bay Area were the two strongest defensive sides in WUSA in 2001, but the match turned out to be a barnburner.  Kylie Bivens, Hooper and Wen scored for Atlanta, but the CyberRays kept pace and the matched was knotted at 3-3 after regulation and overtime.  Bay Area finally prevailed 4-2 on penalty kicks after Hooper and Wen failed to convert.

In 2002, the Beat came into the WUSA’s second season as prohibitive favorites for the title.  Most of the roster returned intact and Wen was healthy for the first time.  The club also left cavernous Bobby Dodd Stadium on the campus of Georgia Tech University for 15,000-seat Herndon Stadium at Morris Brown College, where they would play their final two seasons.   The season was a disappointment, with the Beat finishing 4th at 11-9-1 and falling in the semi-final 2-1 to the eventual champion Carolina Courage.

In 2003, the Beat regained their form, finishing with the second best record in the WUSA at 9-4-8.  The Beat would play in the last match in the WUSA’s brief history when they faced the Washington Freedom at San Diego’s Torero Stadium in the Founders’ Cup III championship game on August 24, 2003.  Charmaine Hooper scored on a PK for the Beat in the first half, but Atlanta couldn’t contain Washington’s budding young superstar Abby Wambach, who scored a pair for the Freedom, including the game winner in overtime.

The WUSA folded three weeks later, falling victim to lack of corporate sponsor interest and weak television ratings, among other woes.

After five seasons without a fully professional women’s league in the United States, Women’s Professional Soccer (WPS) launched in 2009.  For the league’s second season in 2010, WPS added an expansion franchise in Atlanta known as the Atlanta Beat.  The new Beat revived the old WUSA-era name and logo (although with new colors), but otherwise bore no connection to the old club.  The played at a new soccer-specific stadium out in the suburbs and no original Beat players returned to play for the new WPS franchise.  The new Beat played two seasons (2010-2011) before folding.

 

==Atlanta Beat Programs on Fun While It Lasted==

Season Date Opponent Score Program Other

2001

2001 6/6/2001 @ Boston Breakers T 1-1 Program
2001 7/12/2001 @ New York Power W 3-0 Program
2001 8/4/2001 @ Washington Freedom W 2-1 Program
2001 8/18/2001 vs. Philadelphia Charge W 3-2 (OT) Program
2001 8/25/2001 Bay Area CyberRays L Program

2002

2002 7/3/2002 @ Washington Freedom L 2-1 Program
2002 8/4/2002 @ Washington Freedom L 3-2 Program

2003

2003 4/12/2003 vs. Boston Breakers W 6-0 Program Roster
2003 4/26/2003 @ Washington Freedom T 1-1 Program
2003 5/3/2003 vs. San Jose CyberRays L 1-0 Program Roster
2003 5/10/2003 vs. San Diego Spirit T 1-1 Program Roster
2003 5/17/2003 vs. San Jose CyberRays W 1-0 Program Roster
2003 6/7/2003 vs. Carolina Courage L 2-1 Program
2003 6/22/2003 vs. Philadelphia Charge W 4-2 Program Roster
2003 8/24/2003 Washington Freedom L 2-1 (OT) Program

==Key Players==

  • Charmaine Hooper
  • Cindy Parlow
  • Homara Sawa
  • Brianna Scurry
  • Sun Wen

 

==YouTube==

Japanese international midfielder Homare Sawa in action for the Beat against San Diego. June 1, 2002

 

==Links==

Women’s United Soccer Association Media Guides

Women’s United Soccer Association Programs

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April 5, 2003 – Carolina Courage vs. Washington Freedom

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Hege Riise Carolina CourageCarolina Courage vs. Washington Freedom
April 5, 2003
SAS Soccer Park
Attendance: 6,061

Women’s United Soccer Association Programs

 

The Women’s United Soccer Association opened its third and final season on April 5, 2003 with a rematch of the season two Founder’s Cup championship game between the Carolina Courage and the Washington Freedom.  The Courage came out the victors in that title bout, defeating the Freedom 3-2, and they hosted this rematch at SAS Soccer Park, their soccer-specific stadium in Cary, North Carolina.

The Freedom was the WUSA’s glamour franchise led by the game’s brightest star, U.S National Team star Mia Hamm.  The club also featured one of the game’s most promising young stars, the American striker Abby Wambach, drafted out of the University of Florida with the #2 overall pick in the 2002 WUSA college draft.

The Courage, by comparison, was a more workmanlike squad.  Carolina’s American stars – Carla Overbeck, Danielle Fotopoulos and Tiffany Roberts – were strong players who never quite commanded the public adulation of their USWNT teammates Hamm, Brandi ChastainKristine Lilly or Michelle Akers.  Carolina’s best player was the German striker Birgit Prinz, who fueled the team’s championship run in 2002 with 12 goals.  Prinz was entering the peak of her legendary career in 2003, about to reel off a remarkable three-year run (2003-2005) as FIFA’s World Player of the Year.

The match itself reflected the changing of the guard, both in the WUSA and on the U.S. National Team.  Prinz got the Courage on the board first with a sixth minute goal, assisted by Fotopoulos and program cover model Hege Riise.  But the Freedom ultimately got the best of Carolina, thanks to the past and future symbols of the U.S. National Team.   Wambach, emerging as the Americans’ great offensive force of the 2000’s, notched the equalizer in the 44th minute off a feed from Hamm, the brilliant star of the 1990’s.  Hamm then put away the game-winner in the 59th minute in Washington’s 2-1 victory.

The result sent both teams on their course for the 2003 season.  Carolina never recaptured the momentum of their 2002 title run and finished 7th out of 8 teams.  The Freedom finished fourth, but saved their best performances for the postseason, upsetting the top-seeded Boston Breakers in the semis and then defeating the Atlanta Beat for the 2003 Founder’s Cup title in August.  Wambach was the MVP of the title match.

The WUSA folded less than a month later on September 15, 2003 after losing $100 million over three seasons.

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Written by andycrossley

September 22nd, 2012 at 8:31 pm

June 8, 2002 – Philadelphia Charge vs. Washington Freedom

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Philadelphia Charge vs. Washington Freedom
June 8, 2002
Villanova Stadium
Women’s United Soccer Association Programs

Former Washington Freedom supporters club member Kevin Parker (@StarCityFan) sent in this rare Philadelphia Charge program from the  Women’s United Soccer Association this week. Cover girl Heather Mitts was in the early days of her career back in 2002, both as a club pro with the Charge and as a fixture on the U.S. Women’s National Team.

I thought the program made for a nice companion piece to an lengthier column I wrote recently on Mitts’ latter-day career in Women’s Professional Soccer with the Boston Breakers.

The big impact players on the Charge were the team’s foreign stars – striker Marinette Pichon of France and midfielder/forward Kelly Smith of England. Mitts became the biggest American name on the Charge, partly due to her skills and model good looks, and also due to the fact that the established American stars of the day took a dim view to playing in Philly.  WUSA launched each franchise with three “allocated” U.S. National Team players in late 2000.  The players had a voice in which markets they wanted to play in and (reportedly) virtually no one listed Philadelphia.

As a result, the Charge were the only club among the WUSA’s eight franchises that did not receive one of the recognizable stars from the 1999 U.S. National Team that won the World Cup.  Mia Hamm went to Washington, Brandi Chastain headlined in San Jose, goalkeeper Briana Scurry headed to Atlanta, Julie Foudy led San Diego, Kristine Lilly landed in Boston, Tiffeny Milbrett went to the New York Power, and Michelle Akers was allocated to her home town of Orlando (later shifted to Carolina).  The Charge got a largely anonymous allotment of younger players: Mandy Clemens, Lorrie Fair and Saskia Webber.

Mitts was a stalwart for the Charge during the three-year run of the WUSA, appearing in 51 of the team’s 63 matches and earning all-league honors as a defender in 2003. Off the field, Mitts appeared on the cover of Philadelphia Magazine as one of the city’s sexiest singles and dated Philadelphia Phillies outfielder Pat Burrell and later Eagles quarterback A.J. Feeley (whom she married in 2010).

The WUSA folded in September 2003 after three seasons of play.  Mitts tore her ACL in 2007 and missed the World Cup that year, but bounced back in 2008 to win Olympic gold with the USA at Beijing in 2008.  She played three seasons in Women’s Professional Soccer, a successor league to the WUSA, from 2009 to 2011, including a return engagement in the City of Philadelphia with the Philadelphia Independence in the summer of 2010.  She last played professionally for the Atlanta Beat in WPS in 2011.

 

Written by andycrossley

July 6th, 2012 at 5:25 pm

2001-2003 San Diego Spirit

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The San Diego Spirit played three summer seasons from 2001 to 2003 in the Women’s United Soccer Association (WUSA), the first attempt to form a fully professional women’s pro league in North America.  The Spirit endured two seasons of mediocrity, despite the presence of prominent U.S. National Team stars Julie Foudy and Joy Fawcett.  Prior to the 2003 season, the club brought in new Head Coach Omid Namazi and overhauled its roster with top young players, resulting in a winning campaign and the first playoff appearance in franchise history.  Before the Spirit could build on this foundation, however, the WUSA closed up shop in September 2003 after burning through $100 million in three seasons of operations.

The WUSA announced its formation in early 2000, aiming for an April 2001 debut.  The league was organized in a single-entity structure, with $40 million in start-up capital provided by a consortium of Cable TV operators and executives.  Each funder received investor-operator rights to one of eight league markets in return for a commitment of $5 million.  Cable operator Cox Communications purchased rights to San Diego.

The marketing cornerstones of the WUSA would be the stars of the United States Women’s National Team.  The league launched on the backs of the USWNT and their thrilling victory in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup.  The Cup final on July 10th, 1999 drew a sell-out crowd of 90,185 to the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, making it the largest women’s sporting event in history.  The US women defeated China in nerve-wracking fashion on penalty kicks and the tournament made media darlings of American stars Mia Hamm and Brandi Chastain and, to a lesser extent, the rest of the team.  In May 2000, the WUSA allocated three USWNT stars to each of its eight franchises.  San Diego received Fawcett, Foudy and striker Shannon MacMillan, a graduate of nearby Escondido High School.  In the international draft, San Diego also picked up Fan Yunjie and Wen Lirong of the Chinese team which had given the Americans all they could handle in the final.

Cox Communications spent $2.5 million to renovate 40-year old Torero Stadium at the University of San Diego for the Spirit.  The improvements included 3,600 new seats to bring total capacity to just over 6,000, a new and re-graded natural Bermuda grass surface, upgraded lighting to meet television broadcast standards, and various aesthetic improvements.  The renovations turned Torero into a quality venue for professional soccer.  Viewed alongside similar efforts in other WUSA cities – such as the Boston Breakers’ $4 million renovation of Boston University’s Nickerson Stadium – the renovations were also symbolic of the new league’s free-spending ways.  By the end of 2001, WUSA had expended the $40 million intended to fund operations for its first five seasons.

The 2001 Spirit started slow out of the blocks under Head Coach Carlos Juarez before rallying late in the season to finish in 5th place with a record of 7-7-7.  Fawcett missed most of the season due to pregnancy, but returned in August less than two months after giving birth to her third child.  MacMillan was a bright spot.  Her 12 goals were second best in the WUSA to league Most Valuable Player Tiffeny Milbrett.

The 2002 Spirit started slowly again, which cost Juarez his job in early June 2002.  General Manager Kevin Crow, a long-time star for the San Diego Sockers during the 1980’s and 1990’s, assumed coaching duties for the remainder of the season.  The Spirit finished in seventh place with a 5-11-5 record.

Off the field, the Spirit paced the WUSA in season ticket sales despite lackluster play.  In 2002, the Spirit sold more than 2,000 season tickets, which was the best figure in the eight-team league.  The Spirit also benefitted from substantial television advertising drawn against unsold inventory on the Cox cable system.

On the last day of September 2002, the Spirit orchestrated the largest trade in WUSA’s two-year history in order to move up a single spot in the 2003 WUSA college draft.  The Spirit shipped three starters – midfielders Shannon Boxx and Sherrill Kester, defender Margaret Tietjen – plus the #2 overall pick in the 2003 WUSA draft to the New York Power in exchange for the #1 overall pick and midfielders Jan Lalow and Wynne McIntosh.  The prize for the Spirit on the back end of this trade was Santa Clara University midfielder Aly Wagner, already a fixture on the U.S. National Team with 36 caps as a collegian.  Soccer America called Wagner “the most gifted playmaker the United States has produced”.

“Mark Ziegler from The San Diego Union-Tribune is a first class reporter, but he loved to stir it up,” recalled Spirit GM Dave Presher in 2011.  “Well, he really went at us when Shannon Boxx came back to town with the New York Power for the first time after the Aly Wagner trade.  Aly hadn’t scored so far that year.  In practice the day before the New York game she couldn’t hit the frame, putting her free kicks in outer space.  Then on game day she ended up with I believe two goals and an assist and we beat New York 4-2.”

Wagner got the most press attention, but she was just one component of a youth movement that transformed the Spirit in 2003.  22-year old Scottish striker Julie Fleeting returned for her second season and finished tied for third in the WUSA in scoring with 11 goals.   New Coach Omid Namazi used his other two international spots to import the 19-year old Brazilian star Daniela and big Canadian forward Christine Latham, fresh off an All-American career at the University of Nebraska.  It would be Latham, not Wagner, that walked away with WUSA Rookie-of-the-Year honors after scoring six goals.  The young cohort’s contributions were especially significant after offensive leader Shannon MacMillan was lost to a season-ending ACL tear in May.

“My proudest moment was probably the hire of Coach Omid Namazi,” said Presher.  “I think the staff and the league were a bit concerned when I hired an Iranian men’s indoor coach, who had previously punched out a mascot at a game.  But Omid was the real deal and he turned out to be a fantastic coach, leader and partner.”

The 2003 Spirit improved to 8-6-7, good for third place in the WUSA and the franchise’s first and only playoff appearance.  Prior to the season, the WUSA selected San Diego to host the 2003 Founder’s Cup at Torero Stadium.  All that now stood between the Spirit and hosting the title match was the regular season champion Atlanta Beat.  The Spirit travelled to Georgia for the WUSA semi-final on August 17th, 2003.  Aly Wagner scored in the 38th minute to put the Spirit up 1-0.  The lead held up through regulation, but Beat forward Conny Pohlers tapped in the equalizer during stoppage time and Charmaine Hooper won it for Atlanta in overtime, ending the Spirit’s season in heart rending fashion.

The playoff semi-final loss proved to be the final Spirit game.  Investors pulled the plug on the WUSA on September 15th, 2003.  The WUSA folded less than a week before the start of the 2003 Women’s World Cup, providing a sad bookend for a league that was born out of the euphoria of the 1999 tournament.

Just days before the league folded, Spirit GM Dave Presher traded Aly Wagner to the Boston Breakers for midfielder Angela Hucles in a surprising move.  He explained why in a 2011 interview with Fun While It Lasted:

“We had signed <18-year old Brazilian> Marta for the 2004 season and knew she was the best player in the world…we needed one fast central midfielder as we were considering some modifications to our formation with Marta coming aboard.  The league folding sucked.  We may have been overconfident, but we thought with Marta we were going to really be a surprise.”

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In June 2004, a reconstituted Spirit – including Fawcett, Foudy and MacMillan – played in a WUSA exhibition doubleheader before an announced crowd of 7,123 at the Home Depot Center in Los Angeles.  The event was part of a pair of WUSA “festivals” (the other was in Minnesota) which showcased the eight former clubs and their stars to potential new sponsors and investors.  The events drew little interest and the efforts of the WUSA Reorganization Committee wound down soon afterwards.

In 2007 the new Women’s Professional Soccer (WPS) launched as a lower-budget successor league to the WUSA.  San Diego Padres owner John Moores was briefly linked to a WPS franchise, but never moved forward.  In the late summer of 2008, WPS placed a brief release on its website announcing a San Diego franchise.  But the league removed the story days later after and as of late 2011, no further discussions have occurred to bring WPS to San Diego.

The rookie stars of the 2003 Spirit each returned to play in the first season of WPS six summers later in 2009.  Daniela signed with St. Louis Athletica and played four matches before her season – and career – was ended by a brutal tackle from Washington Freedom star Abby Wambach.  Christine Latham scored two goals for the Boston Breakers in 2009.  She was cut in training camp by the Atlanta Beat in 2010.  Aly Wagner, now 28 years old and slowed by assorted injuries, signed with the Los Angeles Sol and played in the first WPS Cup final on August 22nd, 2009.  It was her final match.  She announced her retirement from soccer in January 2010.

Downloads:

2011 Dave Presher Interview
San Diego Spirit Sources

Written by andycrossley

November 13th, 2011 at 11:12 pm

Behind the Scenes at FC Gold Pride with Ilisa Kessler

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Several weeks back, I ran a retrospective on FC Gold Pride, a Women’s Professional Soccer franchise that had a Jekyll & Hyde existence during its brief two-year lifespan.  During FCGP’s first season in 2009, the club was barely competitive, finishing dead last with a roster that some WPS observers derisively referred to as “FC Old Pride”. 

In early 2010, the club engineered a massive reboot, highlighted by the hotly debated $500,000 acquisition of FIFA World Player of the Year Marta. The 2010 FCGP team won the WPS Cup and can make a strong argument to be considered the most dominant women’s club side ever assembled.  But red ink and disinterest sank the club less than two months after its great triumph.

Former FCGP forward Tiffany Weimer contributed an interview, which I hoped to pair with a behind-the-scenes account from FCGP’s former General Manager, Ilisa Kessler.   It took a while to connect with Ilisa and the piece ending up running without her participation.  Too bad, because when we finally got together she turned out to have some killer stories.  I thought the highlights deserved to run here as their own post. 

FWiL:

You worked for three seasons for the San Jose CyberRays of the WUSA before that league abruptly folded in 2003, which must have been traumatic.  When new owners came into the same market ready to try again with women’s soccer in 2008, how did you feel when they asked you to lead the new organization?

Kessler:

First off I was honored to even be asked.  Taking this position was a very difficult decision to make.  I knew the history of women’s pro sports in the Bay Area, I lived it, and it always ended the same way – and the emotional rollercoaster was traumatic.  I learned this as early as being with the San Jose Lasers (American Basketball League) as an intern.  When that folded I was heartbroken.  For the Pride, professionally, I was leaving a stable job in broadcast TV and personally I was in a new place in life because I had a family.  I also knew besides risk, how much work it was going to be to start a business in less than 6 months.  I knew that was going to be taxing, and maybe even impossible.  But again, I was honored, and there are not many opportunities to be a General Manger of a pro sports team, and to be in the sport I love, so how could I say no?  Most importantly, there are not a lot of opportunities for women to be at the General Manager level in sports, and so taking the role, I looked at it as a very serious responsibility.  I hope in the end, I represented women and the sport well.

FWiL:

What was the difference in the reaction of the Bay Area – the media, the soccer community, sponsors – between the arrival of the CyberRays in 2001 and the arrival of FC Gold Pride in 2009?

Kessler

Honestly, I don’t think much changed, at least for the mainstream media and the Bay Area community.  For the Pride, the difference was that there were more avenues for us to try and get exposure – particularly with bloggers (who were great to us from the beginning), Twitter, YouTube and Facebook.  But, in the end, we talked to the same people over and over.  Look at the Big Soccer message boards and the WPS chat on Twitter.  It’s the same voices – which are important voices, but not new voices.

I always thought we had a great website, but great doesn’t mean anything if people are not looking at it.  We tried, but it was hard to break through in such a busy world.  I remember a TV station telling us that they needed “a hook” to cover us for the 2010 WPS Cup championship match.  Obviously bringing a championship to the Bay Area – the 1st since the 2002 San Jose Earthquakes, didn’t mean much.

For the soccer community, well, that’s an interesting paradigm.  I may be generalizing a bit, but from my experience, I found that a majority of the “soccer community” loves soccer if it is about their kid, or their adult rec game.  For them, soccer is  recreation, not entertainment.  There is a difference.  I remember walking soccer fields with <French National Team midfielder> Camille Abily to promote the championship match.  Most said, “we can’t make it, my kid has a game”  or “I have an adult rec game”.  I asked one guy if he wanted to pass with Abily (he was warming up for his match).  He just shrugged and kept passing to his teammate.  I thought, these people are nothing but weekend warriors.  They don’t love soccer.  They just love getting exercise and socializing.

Sponsors are hard to determine – I think they were weary on two fronts – those that knew the history of women’s soccer stood by with a wait & see attitude.  Is it really worth an investment?  And then those that just need to invest in something that will guarantee a return on investment – mostly because the economy has just been so horrible – women’s soccer isn’t that.

FWiL:

What (approximately) was the dollar value of corporate sponsorships that FCGP was able to attract in 2009 and 2010?

Kessler:

We pretty much missed every budget cycle for sponsorship in 2009.  We maybe had $30K in cash and about $165K in barter/in-kind.  The cash didn’t even pay for the operations of one home game.  The hole was so deep from the on-set, it was impossible to dig out of it.  2010 was better.  We got in the sales cycle and realized for us cash is king but offsetting operational costs with barter works for us too.  We got creative.  Our cash went up 857%, and barter up 44%.  We had our medical bartered out – that saved us hundreds of thousands a year in medical and worker’s comp claim costs.  We got all our port-a-potty’s through a sponsorship deal, saving us over $24K.  Even our game program was bartered out – otherwise, we were not going to have one in year 2.  Like I said, we got creative.

FWiL:

In 2010, FC Gold Pride acquired Marta, who was the highest paid female soccer player in the world, at a reported $500,000 year.  Can you explain how her contract was structured?  What was the club on the hook for and how much did sponsors like Amway have to contribute?  Or did they provide sponsorship tied into Marta’s presence that partially offset what you paid out in salary?

Kessler:

Marta’s contract was a 3-year guaranteed contract.  Meaning someone had to pay her – if not a team, then the league itself.  Why there would be a 3-year deal agreed to when the league knew <Los Angeles Sol owner> AEG was only in it for one year, I don’t know….I wasn’t part of that negotiation.  I do know how difficult of a negotiator Marta’s agent is, and the league seemed desperate for credibility in the start and felt that we needed the best female player in the world in the league.  I also know that a player like Marta needs the US too…especially for competition, media and sponsors.  But in the end, she definitely won out.

Amway, has a separate endorsement deal with Marta, and it has nothing to do with the teams.  When we acquired Marta, we had to negotiate with Amway to be a sponsor, which was not easy because they were already in the market with the Earthquakes.

“The Marta Effect” as I like to call it, does not exist off the field.  Her salary does not justify any new business.  It’s not like a Beckham signing where you get incredible ticket sales, sponsorship and jersey sales.  The biggest sale of Marta jerseys went to Marta, she bought a slew for family and friends.  You can’t do any huge media campaign around her because of her limited English.  Reporters are not excited to do an interview with an interpreter, it’s just not the same.

I remember when we picked her up – prior to the Los Angeles Sol dispersal draft day, we created an entire ticket sales plan and staffed heavy in the office – longer hours, etc. to handle the phones.  When it was announced she was coming to the Pride, we sat for an entire day staring at each other waiting for the phones to ring.  When I came in the next morning, I said, new plan – outgoing phone calls start right now. Let’s hit up season ticket holders who haven’t renewed, large groups, teams, everyone, & let them know who we just signed.  At that moment, I thought, crap, she isn’t going to move the dial like we had hoped.

FWiL:

Talk a little about the behind-the-scenes decision to bid on Marta’s contract.  What roles did you, your Head Coach Albertin Montoya and the NeSmith family play in that conversation?  Was it a consensus?  Were any of the veteran players on the team involved in the discussion?

Kessler:

I don’t remember discussing Marta with the veteran players – Albertin may have.  I know throughout, Albertin did discuss with certain players the addition of new players – some we didn’t pursue because of their feedback.

The NeSmith’s discussed Marta with both Albertin and me.  Of course, best player in the world – who doesn’t want to coach or manage that type of player?  But from a pure business standpoint, Brian NeSmith and I discussed how it was not a good business move.  We figured she would not increase tickets and sponsorship to justify her salary.  We knew we would have to be extremely lucky for that to happen.  But, I am sure one reason why the NeSmith’s bought the team in the beginning included the idea of owning a pro team.  If you have the means, it’s an amazing opportunity to own a pro team – especially in the sport you are passionate about.  And so, once you own a team and you are already pumping a lot of money into it, and coming off a losing season, then, adding the best player in the world to your team could definitely make you enjoy your investment that much more.  If you are already losing a few million, what’s another half?

My last conversation with Nancy before the Board meeting that took place where the owners were to decide who could take Marta’s contract, she told me that they were not going to do it.  The call after the Board meeting was Nancy saying, well, we’ve got Marta.  So just like that, I knew the Pride would be the team that would pick Marta up in the draft <a few days later>.  The other teams were going to pass because of cost.  It was a bit of a rollercoaster to say the least since Albertin and I had resigned ourselves to moving on & continuing our player acquisitions without Marta.

FWiL:

Can you share a truth-is-stranger-than-fiction moment from behind the scenes when you wondered what you’d gotten yourself into?  Start-up sports leagues are famous for these and I figure you might have one or two such stories.

Kessler:

I have quite a few, most I can’t tell, but here’s a sampling:

One of my first decisions as GM was to approve Pounce’s (our mascot) chest size.  The first drawing we got had her at about a D-cup.  I asked for B.  If I ever needed a title for a book about my experiences at the Pride, it would be “From the B-Cup to the Championship Cup”.

Year 2 opening day.  My ops department had a complete meltdown the week leading into it.  They were totally unprepared.  The night before, around 7pm, we realized most of the stadium wasn’t loaded in and we had a ton of issues – no wireless for one.  No wireless means no ticket sales on-site.  We were freaking.  I had my entire staff stay till about 2am to load the stadium – field boards, signage, food product, you name it, it was all off-site at a different location.  The WPS league office showed up game day and didn’t think we were going to be able to open gates for the fans.  My brother came to the Bay Area for the game and I called him at 7am to get him to the stadium to help.  We asked a woman off the street with her kid to help for free tickets.  I had a coach from a rec league go get us corner flags.  We moved more barricade that day than I had my entire ops career.  It was a nightmare.  We made it, but if I didn’t have a background in ops and a staff that was willing to do anything, we probably would have never opened. Fans and the team had no idea – we prevailed.

Puma – they were great for us.  Having a national apparel deal is huge for a fledgling league.  I remember the CyberRays days – 3 apparel sponsors in 3 years.  It was awful and stressful.  Even as great as Puma was to the teams, their “lifestyle” designs got in the way of functionality.  The skort was a personal fight with them.  I refused to have my players wear them – here I was trying to legitimize women as strong, athletic, professional athletes, and they wanted them to play in a skort.  Not on my watch.

Then there was a meeting with Puma where they came to our offices and presented their <original> concept for 2011.  They started the presentation with photos of 80’s style one-piece jumpers.  My heart started pounding and I physically had to restrain myself as I started to realize what was about to happen.  They presented us with the “Uni-Kit”, which they pointed out was their “working title”.  Nancy NeSmith was in the meeting with me and our VP of Marketing and Sponsorship, John Hooper.  We all just about had a meltdown.  John and I couldn’t imagine any player wearing a one-piece uniform.  We brought up injuries to the midsection (how does the doctor treat?), what if blood gets on their jersey?  They have to change the entire uniform?  FIFA – do you think they would approve this?  But the best was Nancy.  She flat out said “how do you expect the women to pee?  They have to completely undress to pee?  No way”.  I just laughed.  It was by far one of the most surreal experiences I have ever had in women’s soccer.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE COMPLETE INTERVIEW WITH ILISA KESSLER

Written by andycrossley

November 6th, 2011 at 11:31 pm

Posted in Columns

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